AMAL MOVEMENT PROVIDES ASSISTANCE TO SHIA MUSLIMS

Madeline Robertson/The New Yorker

The Amal Movement has negotiated deals amongst each other to help stranded Shia Muslims, and provide them assistance with healthcare, and food. This is in order to help struggling Shia's come together and get the resources they need.
The Shias have been a deprived minority in Lebanon for many years now, and a proper government system is needed to be established. Meaning, there needs to be equal representation of religion in the government, not just it solely focused on one religious group.
To help equalize the discrimination in the Shia community, it has also been decided to remove their practicing religion from their identity cards, and not make that the focus of a person.
As well, the Amal Movement has decided to agree to a non-aggression pact with the Secular Group, and put forward a proposal with an alliance. It has been agreed that a ban between the Amal and the LRF so they do not go in to each other's territories, and tensions will not occur.
Many Shia people in Lebanon are living in extremely poor conditions in the countryside, forcing them to join the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) just so they can get the basic necessities they need to survive. To help prevent this from happening, the Amal Movement has made moves to open some of the universities in Beirut to stranded Shia Muslims, and provide them with food, and some reassurance.
The Amal Movement has also made plans in regarding healthcare. They will begin to hire their Militia to build hospitals, and utilize the available funds they have so they can help the Shia people. They will provide free healthcare, as well as security and protection for these clinics, in case any enemies of the Shias try to destroy it. The Amal Movement as well plans to use Militia members as a workforce to start construction on the clinics as soon as possible.
"I am extremely pleased with the decisions we have made," said a hopeful Musa al-Sadr, co-founder of the Amal movement, and supporter of the Shia people. "I'm very grateful that we could get this far in helping the deprived people without using any sort of violence or excessive force." This could mean less fighting amongst the Shias and other enemies, and bring them together to receive the care they need to survive. 
The Shia's have not yet had any representative comment on these decisions made by the Amal Movement, but as development continues updates will be sure to come. Many families will be sure to receive a great amount of help. For now, the Shia people have something to be grateful for and look towards the future with bright hopes for their wellbeing. They will no longer have to be forced by hunger to join a militia in order to receive food and aid, and they can all come together in order to receive aid and a sense of hope.